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Salt function


The salt function is characterized by ionic compounds that have at least one cation other than H+ and at least an anion other than (OH)-. Examples: Salt (NaCl), Marble (CaCO3), the plaster (CaSO4), among other substances.

An important feature of salts is that they can be obtained by assembling acids and bases.

Compound salts found in nature in the solid state generally in the form of minerals, or dissolved, as in the case of sodium chloride or table salt (NaCl) present in seawater.

Many salts have a salty taste, some have high solubility in water, and others have solubility values ​​so small that they are not considered insoluble, such as calcium carbonate (CaCO3), a constituent of marble.

When a salt dissolves in water, it undergoes a dissociation similar to that which occurs with the bases, since it is also an ionic compound and in these dissociation ions are released.

NaCl, when dissolved in water, undergoes dissociation, resulting in free ions.+ and Cl-. Normally, salts containing a metal in its composition present it bound to the rest of the structure by ionic bonding. In this connection occurs the breakdown and the consequent separation of ions.

The Na2ONLY4, when dissolved in water, gives rise to two Na + ions and one ion (SO4)2-.

Salts are ionic compounds that have at least one cation other than H+ and at least an anion other than (OH)-.

Salts are important in the functioning of our body. They act, for example, by regulating the amount of water in cells and as constituents of bones and teeth.